I have a friend who left NYC to go back down south because as she said, "it's just time to leave and find better things".  So she quit a very good job she had and left to live in Louisiana.  Well, can you believe that it hasn't even been 1/2 a year and I heard that she's back in NYC?  She claims to have missed not only the city life, but her friend whom she shared an apartment with.   She's now looking for a job.

Three of my aunts - after having lived in NYC all of of their lives:  About 2 years ago, one of my aunts moved out to Florida to retire and be closer to her son, but I hear that she's now back!  She's currently living with a room mate in Brooklyn, but looking for her own apartment.   She says she'll never leave NYC again.   My other two aunts have also moved down south to retire and be away from the city and "its messes", but I'm hearing that they too are making plans to come back - they're just getting the "paperwork ready" (whatever that means) lol

My mom tells me that when and if I move out of New York, that she doesn't even give me 1/2 a year before I start crying that I want to come back!   I don't tell her anything because honestly, I don't know how I'm going to react if I do move out, but I'll leave that up to the usual, "time will tell".

So have any of you ever regretted moving out and if you're contemplating on moving out of NYC, have you wondered if you'll regret doing so?

Views: 126

Comment by Anna on December 12, 2011 at 10:00pm

I'm so glad you brought this up! This is one of the things that scared me most when I was thinking about leaving - both the stories about people who had left and returned, and the finger-wagging from friends who thought (like your mom) that I'd return in less than a year.

Being on the other side now, I can say that yes, there are times that I really miss New York. In a lot of ways, I've just had to swallow that sadness and accept that living there was just one part of my whole life experience. Sort of the same way you might think about an ex - you can get nostalgic, but also recognize that there were reasons you moved on, and that the experience you're having now is better for THIS stage of your life. And most of the time, I honestly don't have to remind myself of those things just because my life in this new place is so much easier.

In the end, the only way you'll know how you'll react to leaving - and if you'll stay gone! - is to try it out. Even though many New Yorkers see leaving as selling out or giving up, in reality, it's a really difficult thing to do, and it takes a lot of guts to take off into the unknown. If you end up back in NYC, who cares? All the naysayers will shut up eventually, and at least then you'll know where you really want to be.

Comment by Elizabeth Doren on April 18, 2012 at 12:11pm

As someone who left more than 10 years ago - here is my thought on this.  The longer I have been a Southerner, the more of a New Yorker I have become.  Does that make any sense?  I think the main problem with New York is the cost of living.  Otherwise, most of us would go back, just saying...

Comment by Paul on May 30, 2012 at 1:46pm

NY is thought of as a higher plane of existence, where the only way out is down. Thus leavers are quitters, failures, chumps.

But listen to what brings people back. It's all the vibe and material things, pretty much. Your life has to be incomplete without constant high energy, jagged emotional peaks, and takeout food at 4am.

Getting sick of all that, and not craving it again, doesn't make you a quitter of a failure.

Comment by stormgal on May 30, 2012 at 6:12pm

Gosh that is so true Paul, never thought of it that way.  It's funny how in the Economist Intelligence Unit's 50 best places to live, even though NYC is used as the measuring base, it is all the way down at number 57!

Comment by Anna on May 30, 2012 at 10:04pm

Elizabeth - I like your comment that the longer you're a Southerner the more of a New Yorker you become. I can relate to this - being elsewhere can make that NY attitude stand out more clearly. Also makes me want to raise the bar a bit in my new hometown.

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